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How To Cook Eggs In A HexClad Pan

par HexClad Cookware

cooking eggs in a hexclad pan

Quite possibly the perfect food, the egg is a convenient source of protein as well as vitamins A, B, E, and K. Oh, and they’re delicious, too. Eggs are great for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even as a snack.

Here’s exactly how you should cook eggs in your HexClad Pans, no matter what type of egg you’re hoping to cook. If you’re wondering whether brown eggs versus white eggs are better, the answer is: they’re all great. The color of the egg shell has to do with the breed of the chicken.

Do: Opt for an 8-inch pan for one person, a 10-inch pan for eggs for two, or a 12-inch pan for four. A griddle pan is a great pan for making fried eggs, too.

Don’t: Skimp on the oil or butter. A slick of hot fat is what allows the eggs to cook perfectly.

How To Make Different Styles of Fried Eggs

People who love fried eggs tend to be very picky about how they’re done. Love a runny yolk? Then go for sunny-side up or over-easy. A bit squeamish about the yolk? Then over-hard is good for you. Here’s how to make fried eggs in your HexClad skillet.


Crispy Fried Eggs

The key to the gorgeously-textured, brown lacy edges on a properly crispy fried egg is using enough oil.

  • Get the skillet good and hot over medium-high heat for 30 seconds, then add oil or butter (about 1 tablespoon per egg is a good bet).
  • Once the oil is shimmering or the butter is melted and foaming, add the egg(s). You’ll want to add them close to the surface of the hot fat so it doesn’t splash and burn you. The whites should set quickly and begin to turn brown.
  • Gently tilt the pan towards you and use a spoon to baste the fat over the tops of the egg whites to allow them to cook.
  • When the yolk is cooked to your liking, use a wide, flat spatula to transfer the eggs to a serving plate and season with salt and pepper. If you like the style of crispy edges but a firmer yolk, briefly cover the pan with a lid until it turns opaque.

Sunny-Side Up Fried Eggs

The key to these picture-perfect eggs is using low heat and enough fat to keep them from sticking to the pan.

  • Place the pan over medium heat and add at least 1 tablespoon of oil or butter for every 2 eggs you plan to cook.
  • When the butter gently foams, crack the eggs into the skillet. Cook until the whites are just set and the yolk is glossy but not opaque, about 3 minutes. Use a wide, flat spatula to transfer the eggs to a serving plate and season with salt and pepper.

Over-Easy, Over-Medium, and Over-Hard Eggs

The method for making runny over-easy eggs, jammy over-medium eggs, or fully-cooked over-hard eggs is the same—what changes is how long you leave the egg to cook after flipping it.

  • To make over-easy eggs: Place the pan over medium heat and add at least 1 tablespoon of oil or butter for every 2 eggs you plan to cook. When the butter gently foams, crack the eggs into the skillet. Cook until the whites are just set and the yolk is glossy but not opaque, about 2 minutes. Use a wide, flat spatula to flip the egg over. Cook for about 30 seconds more to set the white. When pressed gently with a finger, the yolk should be bouncy. Use a wide, flat spatula to transfer the eggs to a serving plate and season with salt and pepper.
  • To make over-medium eggs: Place the pan over medium heat and add at least 1 tablespoon of oil or butter for every 2 eggs you plan to cook. When the butter gently foams, crack the eggs into the skillet. Cook until the whites are just set and the yolk is glossy but not opaque, about 2 minutes. Use a wide, flat spatula to flip the egg over. Cook for about 45 seconds to 1 minute more to set the white. When pressed gently with a finger, the yolk should give slightly but not be bouncy. Use a wide, flat spatula to transfer the eggs to a serving plate and season with salt and pepper.
  • To make over-hard eggs: Place the pan over medium heat and add at least 1 tablespoon of oil or butter for every 2 eggs you plan to cook. When the butter gently foams, crack the eggs into the skillet. Cook until the whites are just set and the yolk is glossy but not opaque, about 2 minutes. Use a wide, flat spatula to flip the egg over. Cook for about 1 minute to 90 seconds more to set the white. When pressed gently with a finger, the yolk should barely give. Use a wide, flat spatula to transfer the eggs to a serving plate and season with salt and pepper.

Scrambled Eggs

Few foods make a better breakfast than scrambled eggs. Here’s a basic method for making the best scrambled eggs for 1. Check out our guide to making scrambled eggs for more tips and tricks.

  • In a small bowl, beat 2 to 3 eggs and 2 tablespoons milk (if using) until uniform in color. Season with a pinch each salt and pepper. Set near the stove.
  • Heat your skillet over low heat for custardy eggs or medium-high for fluffy ones.
  • Add the butter to the pan and let it melt. Once foamy, but not yet browned, pour in the eggs.
  • For custardy eggs, stir constantly until set and small curds have formed. For fluffy, drier eggs, use the spatula to pull the edges into the center (they’ll start to cook faster). Once the curds are set and almost dry, pull the pan off the heat.
  • Fold in any cheese and other mix-ins, then serve the eggs immediately.

P.S. If you’re planning on making a huge batch of scrambled eggs, then you can even try using your roasting pan set over two burners.

If you’re looking to make an omelet, check out our guide to making omelets worthy of the finest French restaurant or straight out of an American diner.



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